I'm a free spirit, dangit.
"I think... I would rather recollect a life misspent on fragile things than spent avoiding moral debt" -Neil Gaiman


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lostsplendor:

When will the world grand me an anime about WWI flyer aces with the stylistic leanings of Attack on Titan.

"…For a moment in the middle of the greyest sky, their eyes met - in their flight to oblivion." /title sequence

"Fritz placed a lone flower into der Freiherr’s lapel before flying to the edge of the world" roll end credits

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 76 notes
gettysburgaddress:

huzzahhistory:

Abraham Lincoln used to wear these adorable goat slippers around the White House. Isn’t that just charming?
Side note: they’re a size 14. At 14, those goats are practically life-sized.

Historically, I didn’t think Lincoln could have been any more of a dork than I had already made him out to be. I was wrong.

gettysburgaddress:

huzzahhistory:

Abraham Lincoln used to wear these adorable goat slippers around the White House. Isn’t that just charming?

Side note: they’re a size 14. At 14, those goats are practically life-sized.

Historically, I didn’t think Lincoln could have been any more of a dork than I had already made him out to be. I was wrong.

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 660 notes
lisalu22:

I love Neil Gaiman so damn much. Best advice on how to raise a reader—let them read…whatever they want to read.

lisalu22:

I love Neil Gaiman so damn much. Best advice on how to raise a reader—let them read…whatever they want to read.

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 4,203 notes

whedonesque:

Zoe: “It’s a fair bet the Alliance knows about Mr. Universe. They’re gonna see this coming.”

Mal: “No. They’re not gonna to see this coming.”

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 229 notes
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Night Witch
On October 8, 1941 the Soviet armed forces created three all-women aviation regiments. One was for fighters, one for dive bombers, and one for night bombers. The latter were called the 48th Taman Guards Night Bomber Aviation Regiment and they were legendary.
The women of the 48th Regiment were trained to fly bombing missions behind German lines in the dead of night. The dangerous missions were made more so by the poor equipment provided for the women. The aircraft they used as a Polikarpov PO-2 which was built in the 1920s and was a bi-plane made of wood and canvas. The planes had no radio or radar. Their bombs were held to the wings by wire.
But it made no difference to the women who joined, including Nadezhda (Nadia) Popova. She was only 19 years old when she enlisted, and her motive was simple: revenge. The Germans had destroyed her home and her brother was killed on the front. 
During her four years in the air, Lieutenant Colonel Popova would fly 582 missions on the Eastern Front in Europe. One particularly busy evening, she and her co-pilot Katya Ryabova, above left, flew 18 missions.
Lt. Col. Popova and her fellow pilots were unofficially known as “Stalin’s Falcons.” But to the Germans they were known as Nachthexen, or “Night Witches.” Because of the plane’s construction it could easily fly below radar allowing them to surprise the enemy in the middle of the night. The Nazis were terrified of them.
The 46th Aviation Regiment would remain women-only throughout the war, flying over 23,000 missions and dropping over 3,000 tons of bombs. They did suffer casualties, losing 30 pilots during the war.
Lt. Col. Popova would see herself shot down on several occasions. One such incident over the Caucus Mountains resulted in a meeting with another injured pilot - who she later married.
In recognition of her of service to her country Lt. Col. Popova earned the highest honor awarded to citizens of the U.S.S.R., Hero of the Soviet Union. She was also awarded a Gold Star, the Order of Lenin, and the Order of the Red Star.
Nadezhda Popova died on July 8, 2013 at the age of 91.
"I can still imagine myself as a young girl, up there in my little bomber. And I ask myself, ‘Nadia – how did you do it?’"
Sources: The Daily Telegraph, Rianovosti, and Wikipedia
(Image of Nadezhda Popova, right, and her co-pilot Katya Ryabova is courtesy of The Hargrave History of Aviation)
Other Aviatrices featured on Obit of the Day:
Violet Cowden - Member of the WASPs
Barbara Harmer - Only woman to pilot the Concorde
Evelyn Bryan Johnson - Most flight hours of any woman in history
Sally Ride - First female astronaut in U.S. history
Betty Skelton - “The fastest woman alive”
Patricia Wilson - Flew in the Civil Air Defense during World War II

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Night Witch

On October 8, 1941 the Soviet armed forces created three all-women aviation regiments. One was for fighters, one for dive bombers, and one for night bombers. The latter were called the 48th Taman Guards Night Bomber Aviation Regiment and they were legendary.

The women of the 48th Regiment were trained to fly bombing missions behind German lines in the dead of night. The dangerous missions were made more so by the poor equipment provided for the women. The aircraft they used as a Polikarpov PO-2 which was built in the 1920s and was a bi-plane made of wood and canvas. The planes had no radio or radar. Their bombs were held to the wings by wire.

But it made no difference to the women who joined, including Nadezhda (Nadia) Popova. She was only 19 years old when she enlisted, and her motive was simple: revenge. The Germans had destroyed her home and her brother was killed on the front. 

During her four years in the air, Lieutenant Colonel Popova would fly 582 missions on the Eastern Front in Europe. One particularly busy evening, she and her co-pilot Katya Ryabova, above left, flew 18 missions.

Lt. Col. Popova and her fellow pilots were unofficially known as “Stalin’s Falcons.” But to the Germans they were known as Nachthexen, or “Night Witches.” Because of the plane’s construction it could easily fly below radar allowing them to surprise the enemy in the middle of the night. The Nazis were terrified of them.

The 46th Aviation Regiment would remain women-only throughout the war, flying over 23,000 missions and dropping over 3,000 tons of bombs. They did suffer casualties, losing 30 pilots during the war.

Lt. Col. Popova would see herself shot down on several occasions. One such incident over the Caucus Mountains resulted in a meeting with another injured pilot - who she later married.

In recognition of her of service to her country Lt. Col. Popova earned the highest honor awarded to citizens of the U.S.S.R., Hero of the Soviet Union. She was also awarded a Gold Star, the Order of Lenin, and the Order of the Red Star.

Nadezhda Popova died on July 8, 2013 at the age of 91.

"I can still imagine myself as a young girl, up there in my little bomber. And I ask myself, ‘Nadia – how did you do it?’"

Sources: The Daily Telegraph, Rianovosti, and Wikipedia

(Image of Nadezhda Popova, right, and her co-pilot Katya Ryabova is courtesy of The Hargrave History of Aviation)

Other Aviatrices featured on Obit of the Day:

Violet Cowden - Member of the WASPs

Barbara Harmer - Only woman to pilot the Concorde

Evelyn Bryan Johnson - Most flight hours of any woman in history

Sally Ride - First female astronaut in U.S. history

Betty Skelton - “The fastest woman alive”

Patricia Wilson - Flew in the Civil Air Defense during World War II

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 625 notes
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer
Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.
She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 
Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a
After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.
Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.
Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.
In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.
Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.
Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia
(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)
Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:
Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”
Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”
Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer

Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.

She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 

Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a

After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.

Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.

Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.

In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.

Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.

Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia

(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)

Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:

Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”

Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”

Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 335 notes

89cats:

(by Marcel Schwarz)

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 3,224 notes

…and I always will be.

1 day ago on July 28th, 2014 | J | 19,401 notes
2 days ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 476 notes

beggars-opera:

Reproduction 1740s stays

2 days ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 361 notes
2 days ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 1,025 notes

icecooly94:

clockadile:

iygrittenothing:

#I DON’T THINK YOU UNDERSTAND HOW MUCH I LOVE ZUKO AND HIS CHARACTER ARC

My favourite thing about this, is that he goes back to his father, and holds him accountable for his actions. He’s thought he was in the wrong for years. That it was his fault he lost his honour. To see him come to this understanding that he was a child and his father was the responsible party was amazing.

i really enjoy how this shows the way some kids feel when they’re abused like it’s their fault and they could’ve done something different but it’s not true the bottom line is that ozai didn’t try to teach his son honor, he abused his son in order to make him quiet

2 days ago on July 27th, 2014 | J | 109,827 notes

do you know what the definition of a hero is? someone who gets other people killed. you can look it up later | serenity (2005)

4 days ago on July 25th, 2014 | J | 2,603 notes
4 days ago on July 25th, 2014 | J | 209,631 notes

lostsplendor:

"Why was Goody Garlick, accused of witchcraft in 1658, spared the fate that would befall the women of Massachusetts decades later" - via Smithsonianmag

5 days ago on July 24th, 2014 | J | 72 notes